Frequently Asked Questions

WHEN DO I NEED TO CALL THE DOCTOR?

Listed below are some guidelines for calling the doctor. They are meant to be only guidelines. Anytime that you are uncomfortable with something this is happening with your child or you have a concern that you feel needs to be addressed, please call. Parents know their children best and sometimes just a “feeling” is a good reason to call.

  • Rectal temperature greater than 100.4 in an infant less than 2 months of age.
  • Rectal temperature elevation of 103 or greater that is persistent.
  • When a child is listless and appears ill whether or not there is fever.
  • Persistent vomiting.
  • Persistent diarrhea (frequent watery stools).
  • Crying as if in pain from unknown cause.
  • A fall or accident that may have resulted in a head injury, broken bone or laceration.
  • Uncontrolled bleeding.
  • Limp or refusal to use an extremity.
  • Change in consciousness, fainting or seizure.
  • Bumps, cuts or animal bites.
  • Possible ingestion of poisons or foreign bodies.
  • Rapid, noisy or difficult breathing.
  • Progressive or persistent rash, especially if associated with other symptoms of illness.

Before placing a call to the doctor or nurse, you may want to have a pencil and paper available for taking notes. If your child is ill, you may want to take his/her temperature so that you will have that information. If someone other than yourself if caring for your child, it’s important that they give you adequate information before you call. For instance, if the child is vomiting it is helpful to know for how long and how often.  If he/she has diarrhea, it is helpful to know how many stools he/she has had, the consistency, and for how long. The more information that is available to us, the more help we can be in deciding how best to treat your child. You may also want to have your pharmacy number available in case we need to phone in a prescription for you.


WHEN IS MY CHILD DUE FOR HIS/HER NEXT CHECKUP AND NEXT IMMUNIZATIONS (SHOTS)?

Routine Office Visits Schedule

Age

What to Expect

Immunizations

Lab Work

3 weeks of age

Ht, Wt, HC, Doctor Exam

None

PKU, CBC, Urinalysis

2 months of age

Ht, Wt, HC, Doctor Exam

Pentacel, Prevnar, Hep B**, RotaTeq*

None

4 months of age

Ht, Wt, HC, Doctor Exam

Pentacel, Prevnar, RotaTeq*, Hep B** (If not given at 2 months)

None

6 months of age

Ht, Wt, HC, Doctor Exam

Pentacel, Prevnar, RotaTeq* (do not give if the child is more than 32 weeks)

CBC, Urinalysis

9 months of age

Ht, Wt, HC, Doctor Exam

Hep B**

None

12 months of age

Ht, Wt, HC, Doctor Exam

Prevnar*, Varivax, Hep A*

CBC, Urinalysis

15 months of age

Ht, Wt, HC, Doctor Exam

Pentacel, MMR

None

18 months of age

Ht, Wt, HC, Doctor Exam

Hep A*

CBC, Urinalysis

2 years of age

Ht, Wt, HC, Doctor Exam

Hep A* (if not given at 18 months)

CBC, Urinalysis

3-4 years of age

Ht, Wt, BP, HR, Doctor Exam

Prevnar (if needed)

CBC, Urinalysis

5 years of age

Ht, Wt, BP, HR, Doctor Exam

DTaP, IPV, ProQuad

CBC, Urinalysis

6-10 years of age

Ht, Wt, HC, Doctor Exam

(catch-up-Hep A*, Varivax)

CBC, Urinalysis

11 years of age

 

TDaP, Menactra**, HPV*

CBC, Urinalysis

12 years of age

 

catch-up all vaccines

 

 

The American Academy of Pediatrics, Centers for Disease Control, American Academy of Family Physicians, and our physicians recommend all of the above vaccines.

(* not required for school admission)
(** required for admission to most colleges)


HOW DO I TAKE AND TREAT A FEVER WITH MY CHILD?

How to Take a Temperature

  1. Use a rectal thermometer. Check to be sure that the reading is below the arrow. Shake down if necessary.
  2. Lubricate the tip of the thermometer with oil or Vaseline.
  3. While seated, place the baby tummy-down across your lap.
  4. Insert the bulb of the thermometer about 1 inch into the rectum. Rest the hand holding the thermometer against the baby’s bottom so should the baby move, your hand and the thermometer will move with him.
  5. Hold the thermometer in the rectum for about 3 minutes and then read. If you are uncomfortable taking a rectal temperature, you may take an axillary temperature by holding the thermometer firmly under the baby’s arm for 5 minutes.

If your child has a fever, you may want to treat it while you wait for your call to be returned or before you place your call.

How to Treat Fever/Oral Medications with Children’s ACETAMINOPHEN

 
CHILDREN’SACETAMINOPHEN  Infant’s Drops: Old Formula 80mg/0.8mL

Infant & Children’s   Liquid

New Formula 160mg/5mL

Chewable Tablets &/OR Melting Strips 80mg Regular Strength Tablets325mg
Weight Dropper mL teaspoon (tsp) Tablet/Strip Tablet
  
6-10 lbs
0.4mL
1.25 mL (1/4 tsp)
11-17 lbs
0.8mL 2.5 mL (1/2 tsp)
18-23 lbs
1.2mL (0.8+0.4mL) 3.75 mL (3/4 tsp)
24-37 lbs
1.6mL
(0.8+0.8mL)
5 mL (1 tsp) 1 tablet/strip
38-47 lbs
7.5 mL (1 1/2 tsp)
48-72 lbs
10 mL (2 tsp) 2 tablets/strips 1 tablet
73-94 lbs
15 mL (3 tsp) 3 tablets/strips
95-146 lbs
20 mL (4 tsp) 4 tablets/strips
147 + lbs
30 mL (6 tsp)
6 tablets/strips
2 tablets

How to Treat Fever/Oral Fever Medications with Children’s IBUPROFEN

 
CHILDREN’S IBUPROFEN Infant’s Drops
50mg/1.25mL
Children’s Liquid
100mmg/5mL
 Chewable Tablets
50mg tabs

Junior Strength  Tablets
100mg
Adult Tablets200mg
Weight Dropper mL Teaspoon (tsp) Tablet Tablet Tablet
  
Under 6 mos
Consult Your Child’s Doctor
11-15 lbs
1.25mL
    2.5mL      (1/2 tsp)
1 tablets
16-21 lbs 1.875mL
    3.75mL     (3/4 tsp)
22-32 lbs
2.5mL
5mL (1 tsp) 2 tablets
1 tablet
33-43 lbs
3.75mL
     7.5mL      (1 1/2 tsp) 3 tablets
44-54 lbs
5mL
10mL (2 tsp) 4 tablets 2 tablets 1 tablet
55-65 lbs

   12.5mL     (2 1/2 tsp)

5 tablets
66-87 lbs
15mL (3 tsp) 6 tablets 3 tablets