Learn More About Our Latest Research

At the Alabama Center for Childhood Cancer and Blood Disorders at Children's of Alabama, UAB pediatric physician-scientists conduct basic and clinical research in diverse areas including brain tumors, solid tumors, new therapy development and reduction of long-term treatment complications, with an emphasis on the genetic basis of cancer in rare marrow failure syndromes. We currently have 26 phase I/II trials open.

Dr. Alyssa Reddy oversees our growing Developmental Therapeutics program, which brings the newest drugs to patients with difficult to treat cancers. She is the institution's PI for the COG Phase 1 Consortium, of which we have been a part for 10 years.

Dr. Jeffrey Lebensburger and Dr. Brandi Pernell are working closely with our pulmonary medicine colleagues to improve the care of patients with sickle cell complicated by asthma or pulmonary hypertension, and Dr. Julie Wolfson is working to understand the underlying causes of outcomes disparities experienced by adolescents and young adults with cancer, and to develop strategies to eliminate the AYA Gap.

The Goldman laboratory, led by Dr. Frederick Goldman, is using a mouse model of sickle cell disease to help us better understand the toxicities of chemotherapy for patients with sickle cell disease. UAB is one of the few transplant centers in the U.S. specializing in BMT for sickle cell disease and will soon open a multi-institutional haploidentical protocol.

Dr. Gregory Friedman's innovative phase 1 study using a modified virus to attack difficult to treat brain tumors. We are currently recruiting patients from across the country. Dr. Friedman's trial is the culmination of many years of hard work that began when he was a fellow here and is the true definition of developmental therapeutics, with the hope for more effective and less toxic treatments for our children battling brain cancers.

Download the Committed to a Cure Cancer Infographic

Download the Committed to a Cure Sicklecell Infographic

Download the Committed to a Cure Neuro-Oncology Infographic